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Video: Zeitgeist - Part 3: How The Bankers Control the World


This is part three of the documentary Zeitgeist.  The word zeitgeist means "the defining spirit or mood of a particular period of history as defined by the ideas and beliefs of the time."   Part three details the global elites, those that own and control the central banks and as a result, just about everything else of consequence.  It goes into who they are and what they've done and are doing to this planet to achieve their maniacal goals to control all of mankind.  These are not kind beneficent people.  They are the ones that cause all wars and are behind all the raping and pillaging going on throughout the world.

Part 1 jumps into the fray with a discussion of religion as one of the oldest and most powerful forms of control known to man.  While it focuses primarily on Christianity, it reveals how the religious stories told to believers are remarkably similar between religions and it's stunning to trace them back long before Christ was ever born.  See Part 1 here.

Part 2 emphasized how those in power use fear and conflict as another primary means of controlling populations.  Learn the truth behind the events of 9-11 and the reality that it was deliberately orchestrated by the global elites to start yet another war through which they can continue their agenda for world conquest.  See Part 2 here.

For more info on the movie please visit the official web site at: zeitgeistmovie.com

 

 
 
 
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Video: The Money Masters - The Complete History of Money and Those That Control It


This amazing 3.5 hour documentary covers the entire history of money and who has control of it.  I guarantee you if you devote the time to watch this entire film, you will truly understand the way the world works and who really controls it.  You'll discover who actually orchestrated all major wars, all inflation, all boom and bust cycles and even caused the great stock market crashes and depression.  Learn how a handful of privileged few have conned everyone into letting them legally counterfeit money and through that power, they have stolen the bulk of the wealth on this planet for themselves.

 

 
 
 
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Video: The Secret of OZ - From the Director/Writer of the Money Masters!


The economy of the U.S. is in a deflationary spiral. Nothing can stop it -- except monetary reform.

  1. No more national debt. Nations should not be allowed to borrow. If they want to spend, they have to take the political heat right away by taxing.
  2. No more fractional reserve lending. Banks can only lend money they actually have.
  3. Gold money is NOT the answer. Historically gold ALWAYS works against a thriving middle class and ALWAYS works to create a plutocracy.
  4. The total quantity of money + credit in a national system must be fixed, varying only with the population.

 

 
 
 
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Video: Inside Job


This is a look at the film 'Inside Job' provides a comprehensive analysis of the global financial crisis of 2008, which at a cost over $20 trillion, caused millions of people to lose their jobs and homes in the worst recession since the Great Depression, and nearly resulted in a global financial collapse. The film traces the rise of a rogue industry which has corrupted politics, regulation, and academia. It was made on location in the United States, Iceland, England, France, Singapore, and China.

 

 
 
 
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Video: Worse Than Useless - Andreas M. Antonopoulos Explains Bitcoin

Bitcoin Explained By One of The Pioneers


Bitcoin explained by Andreas Antonopoulos.  Andreas articulates, with incredible clarity, the critical importance of privacy and how it intersects with money, technology, government and individuals.

 

 
 
 
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Ripping Off Young America: The College-Loan Scandal


The federal government has made it easier than ever to borrow money for higher education - saddling a generation with crushing debts and inflating a bubble that could bring down the economy

 

By Matt Taibbi
RollingStone

On May 31st, president Barack Obama strolled into the bright sunlight of the Rose Garden, covered from head to toe in the slime and ooze of the Benghazi and IRS scandals. In a Karl Rove-ian masterstroke, he simply pretended they weren't there and changed the subject.

The topic? Student loans. Unless Congress took action soon, he warned, the relatively low 3.4 percent interest rates on key federal student loans would double. Obama knew the Republicans would make a scene over extending the subsidized loan program, and that he could corner them into looking like obstructionist meanies out to snatch the lollipop of higher education from America's youth. "We cannot price the middle class or folks who are willing to work hard to get into the middle class," he said sternly, "out of a college education."

Flash-forward through a few months of brinkmanship and name-calling, and not only is nobody talking about the IRS anymore, but the Republicans and Democrats are snuggled in bed together on the student-loan thing, having hatched a quick-fix plan on July 31st to peg interest rates to Treasury rates, ensuring the rate for undergrads would only rise to 3.86 percent for the coming year.

Though this was just the thinnest of temporary solutions – Congressional Budget Office projections predicted interest rates on undergraduate loans under the new plan would still rise as high as 7.25 percent within five years, while graduate loans could reach an even more ridiculous 8.8 percent – the jobholders on Capitol Hill couldn't stop congratulating themselves for their "rare" "feat" of bipartisan cooperation. "This proves Washington can work," clucked House Republican Luke Messer of Indiana, in a typically autoerotic assessment of the work done by Beltway pols like himself who were now freed up for their August vacations.

Not only had the president succeeded in moving the goal posts on his spring scandals, he'd teamed up with the Republicans to perpetuate a long-standing deception about the education issue: that the student-loan controversy is now entirely about interest rates and/or access to school loans.

Obama had already set himself up as a great champion of student rights by taking on banks and greedy lenders like Sallie Mae. Three years earlier, he'd scored what at the time looked like a major victory over the Republicans with a transformative plan to revamp the student-loan industry. The 2010 bill mostly eliminated private banks and lenders from the federal student-loan business. Henceforth, the government would lend college money directly to students, with no middlemen taking a cut. The president insisted the plan would eliminate waste and promised to pass the savings along to students in the form of more college and university loans, including $36 billion in new Pell grants over 10 years for low-income students. Republican senator and former Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander bashed the move as "another Washington takeover."

The thing is, none of it – not last month's deal, not Obama's 2010 reforms – mattered that much. No doubt, seeing rates double permanently would genuinely have sucked for many students, so it was nice to avoid that. And yes, it was theoretically beneficial when Obama took banks and middlemen out of the federal student-loan game. But the dirty secret of American higher education is that student-loan interest rates are almost irrelevant. It's not the cost of the loan that's the problem, it's the principal – the appallingly high tuition costs that have been soaring at two to three times the rate of inflation, an irrational upward trajectory eerily reminiscent of skyrocketing housing prices in the years before 2008.

How is this happening? It's complicated. But throw off the mystery and what you'll uncover is a shameful and oppressive outrage that for years now has been systematically perpetrated against a generation of young adults. For this story, I interviewed people who developed crippling mental and physical conditions, who considered suicide, who had to give up hope of having children, who were forced to leave the country, or who even entered a life of crime because of their student debts.

They all take responsibility for their own mistakes. They know they didn't arrive at gorgeous campuses for four golden years of boozing, balling and bong hits by way of anybody's cattle car. But they're angry, too, and they should be. Because the underlying cause of all that later-life distress and heartache – the reason they carry such crushing, life-alteringly huge college debt – is that our university-tuition system really is exploitative and unfair, designed primarily to benefit two major actors.

First in line are the colleges and universities, and the contractors who build their extravagant athletic complexes, hotel-like dormitories and God knows what other campus embellishments. For these little regional economic empires, the federal student-loan system is essentially a massive and ongoing government subsidy, once funded mostly by emotionally vulnerable parents, but now increasingly paid for in the form of federally backed loans to a political constituency – low- and middle-income students – that has virtually no lobby in Washington.

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The Public Bank Option – Safer, Local and Half the Cost


The Web of Debt Blog

Phil Murphy, a former banker with a double-digit lead in New Jersey’s race for governor, has made a state-owned bank a centerpiece of his platform. If he wins on November 7, the nation’s second state-owned bank in a century could follow.   

A UK study published on October 27, 2017 reported that the majority of politicians do not know where money comes from. According to City A.M. (London) :

More than three-quarters of the MPs surveyed incorrectly believed that only the government has the ability to create new money. . . .

The Bank of England has previously intervened to point out that most money in the UK begins as a bank loan. In a 2014 article the Bank pointed out that “whenever a bank makes a loan, it simultaneously creates a matching deposit in the borrower’s bank account, thereby creating new money.”

The Bank of England researchers said that 97% of the UK money supply is created in this way. In the US, the figure is about 95%. City A.M. quoted Fran Boait, executive director of the advocacy group Positive Money, who observed:

“Despite their confidence in telling the public that there is ‘no magic money tree’ to pay for vital services, politicians themselves are shockingly ignorant of where money actually comes from.

“There is in fact a ‘magic money tree’, but it’s in the hands of commercial banks, such as Barclays, HSBC and RBS, who create money whenever they make loans.”

For those few politicians who are aware of the banks’ magic money tree, the axiom that the people should own the banks – or at least some of them – is a no-brainer. One of these rare politicians is Phil Murphy, who has a double-digit lead in New Jersey’s race for governor. Formerly a Wall Street banker himself, Murphy knows how banking works. That helps explain why he has boldly made a state-owned bank a centerpiece of his platform. He maintains that New Jersey’s billions in tax dollars should be kept in the state’s own bank, where it can leverage its capital to fund local infrastructure, small businesses, affordable housing, student loans, and other state needs. New Jersey voters go to the polls on November 7.

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In a Cashless World, You'd Better Pray the Power Never Goes Out


Editor's Note: It is sold as a convenience, like every other form of control foisted on humanity but it's NOT A GOOD IDEA. The bankers already have almost total control over us. Let them do this and game over.

By Ryan McMaken
Mises.org

When Hurricane Maria knocked out power in Puerto Rico, residents there realized they were going to need physical cash — and a lot of it.

Bloomberg reported yesterday that the Fed was forced to fly a planeload of cash to the Island to help avert disaster:

    William Dudley, the New York Fed president, put the word out within minutes, and ultimately a jet loaded with an undisclosed amount of cash landed on the stricken island...

    [Business executive in Puerto Rico] described corporate clients’ urgent requests for hundreds of thousands in cash to meet payrolls, and the challenge of finding enough armored cars to satisfy endless demand at ATMs. Such were the days after Maria devastated the U.S. territory last month, killing 39 people, crushing buildings and wiping out the island’s energy grid. As early as the day after the storm, the Fed began working to get money onto the island,

For a time, unless one had a hoard of cash stored up in one's home, it was impossible to get cash at all. 85 percent of Puerto Rico is still without power, as of October 9. Bloomberg continues: "When some generator-powered ATMs finally opened, lines stretched hours long, with people camping out in beach chairs and holding umbrellas against the sun."

 

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Student Loan Collection Draws CFPB Attention And Ire


The CFPB laid down some serious fines on National Collegiate Student Loan Trusts and its debt collector, Transworld Systems, Inc. The firms were collectively ordered to pay $26.1 million for attempting to collect on loans that were at best out of date and at worst nonexistent.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) specifically alleges that the firms would drag “borrowers” into court or pursue aggressive collection actions on consumers whose debts had already expired — or on debts that they could not actually prove were owed. The action against the entities further alleges that they relied on false and misleading legal documents to compel funds out of consumers illegally.

All in all, the trust filed nearly 500 lawsuits (486 at current count, though that number could climb) on debts where the statute of limitations for collections had already expired — totaling about $3.5 million in funds collected from consumers that they arguably no longer owed.

National Collegiate Student Loan Trusts is comprised of 15 trusts that own more than 800,000 private student loans in total. In the years before the financial crisis — when the world started taking a much more jaundiced look at the practice — the firm specialized in buying up student loans and packaging out those loans to investors.

And — like the subprime mortgage loans whose securitization brought on the housing bubble and the resultant recession — the paperwork associated with National Collegiate securitized student loans was often flawed or incomplete, according to the CFPB.

Harm to Consumers

Those debts, the CFPB noted in its complaint, had extremely pernicious results for consumers. Reports indicated that the debt collection agency filed nearly 95,000 lawsuits across the country between 2012 and 2016.

In 2,000 suits, National Collegiate could neither produce proof of ownership of the debt nor a promissory note, which borrowers sign promising to repay the loan. Despite being unable to produce those documents necessary to validate their debt, Transworld employees nonetheless signed sworn affidavits claiming to have reviewed account records they never read — and even, at times, had interns and mailroom clerks execute affidavits when there were backlogs.

Borrowers paid $21 million in judgments against them.

The trust’s collection practices were so extreme that Donald Uderitz, the founder of private equity firm Vantage Capital Group (VCG) and beneficial owner of the trusts (his company receives any money remaining after noteholders are paid), became concerned enough to bring in an auditor in 2015 to review the work of the company charged with handling loan payments and maintaining custody of the loan documents.

The End of a Long Investigation

The new settlements come after a three-year investigation — and still must be signed off on by a federal judge.

Uderitz noted that they collaborated with the CFPB on the agreement and they would work with the agency “to finish the job.”

”We frankly welcomed the intervention of the CFPB to help us to put an end to these appalling practices,” he said.

Transworld will pay a $2.5 million fine and take other measures “in order to avoid costly and potentially protracted litigation with our primary regulator,” it said in a statement.

The trust — as is standard practice — has neither admitted nor denied the CFPB finding, but has affirmed that its business practices “adhere to all federal and state consumer protection laws and embody best practices in the industry.”

Student loan debt, however, remains something of a sword of Damocles hanging over the head of the economy. As of the end of Q2, 11.2 percent of all outstanding student loan debt was 90 days past due or defaulted, a greater proportion than for credit cards and mortgages, according to the New York Federal Reserve Bank.

The CFPB has also been recently making noises about toughening regulation on debt collectors, due to the annual tidal wave of complaints from consumers about illegal and harassing practices by various debt collectors.

As of yet, no new rule has been proposed.

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